State of the Black Union

The University of Alabama’s Black Student Union and University Programs hosted their annual State of the Black Union Event Feb. 28.

By Malia Davis
News Reporter

The University of Alabama’s Black Student Union and University Programs hosted their annual State of the Black Union Event Feb. 28.

The event honors the past, present and future of the University of Alabama. For this year’s State of the Black Union, the highlight was honoring the African American women who have made and are currently making an impact on UA.

“It is important to have the State of the Black Union because it allows black students on campus to come together and be motivated by former successful students of influential members in the black community,” said Mackenzie Peterson, BSU Parliamentarian. “It also shows how far you can make it even when others are waiting for you to fail.”

To honor these women, the event had a live museum of students portraying women like Terry Points, Brenda Mccampbell Lyons, Lena Prewitt, Dianne Kirksey-Floyd, Vivian Malone-Jones, Autherine Lucy Foster, and Delores Boyd. All these women had an affect on the university.

The event invited Sheryl Wheeler as a keynote speaker of the night. Wheeler was one of few black students who attended UA in 1978. She talked about her experience as a black student at UA and how important it is to help generations that follow.

“It doesn’t matter what you do, you have to take that rope and throw it back and pull others through,” Wheeler said.

Tiara Pennington, the first black Miss University of Alabama, was honored at the State of the Black Union because she won this title and is pushing for more minorities to run in the future.

Following the speeches, there was a performance by an UA acapella group called UA Tune In and a poetry performance by Imani Williams.

The annual event has been ideal for students on campus because it is an event that shows that they can be successful despite the odds against them and the color of their skin, organizers said. It gives students inspiration and motivation to accomplish their goals.

“It is important because it is a way to showcase great things that black people have accomplished and it inspires me to want to fill their shoes one day,” said UA student Ashleigh Riddle.